Venske & Spänle

"Uno con otros"

Javier Hontoria

Julia Venske and Gregor Spänle are sculptors, but is their language unique and purely sculptural? No. It may seem so, yes, in view of the materials they use and their way of proceeding, but their work not only delves into areas that may well belong to other disciplines, but also seems to contradict the basic principles of their own medium.

Many of these sculptures interact with objects belonging to the everyday stock. Thus, one of them engages in a dialogue with a radio cassette player, another examines a beer bottle box, another finds it in a shopping bag.
"Uno con otros" | Javier Hontoria

Works

  • Orophyt ortles

    Venske & Spänle

    "Orophyt ortles"

    2007

    57.00 x 21.00 x 20.00 cm

    Bronze

    Polishing

  • Smörf 2A52

    Venske & Spänle

    "Smörf 2A52"

    2013

    47.00 x 14.00 x 39.00 cm

    Carrara marble

    Polished

  • Smörf 2A56

    Venske & Spänle

    "Smörf 2A56"

    2013

    31.00 x 27.00 x 9.00 cm

    Lasa marble

    Polished

Reviews

venske

LIFE OF A SCULPTURE

JAVIER HONTORIA

The fundamental subject that runs through their discourse is the material, a type of marble extracted from the Italian quarry of Lasa. From what the artists tell us they usually make the first cuts in their study in Munich and then finish off the sculpture and polish it in the New York neighbourhood of Brooklyn. It is undoubtedly the extraordinary malleability of these abstract entities, their elasticity and dynamism which can lead viewers to some worrying crossroads. Where do these shapes emerge from? Do they really have life?

Julia Venske and Gregor Spänle are sculptors, but, is their language solely and purely sculptural? No. It may appear to be, yes, in view of the materials they use and the way they proceed with their work, but their work not only centres on terrain that could belong to other disciplines, but rather, it appears to contradict the basic principles of the discipline itself. 

A major part of these new stimuli are reaffirmed in the relationship between viewers, space and the sculptures themselves. It is an obvious hidden message to the minimalist practices of the sixties, those reviled by Michael Fried through his excessively theatrical character.

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